Category Archives: Leadership & Management

Respect your team

Respect your team

Last week I was invited by a local charity to give a talk. The charity is Oakleaf, who supports people with mental ill health, giving them the skills, confidence and training needed to return to the workplace.

My talk was for their Health Leaders sharing my own thoughts on practical ways employers can help their people feel valued and proud of the work they do – just one small step towards hopefully improving people’s well being at work.

Not forgetting of course the business benefits of how it contribute to productivity, staff retention and customer service.

I covered 5 core leadership actions and one of these was respect.

It’s often little actions (or lack of action) that can unwittingly leave a team feeling they’re not respected. And of course when this happens it can have a negative impact on their perception of the business, the importance of their role, or their relationship with colleagues.

Here are the 5 principles we discussed in relation to respecting your team:

Common Courtesies

This is something most people do without thinking.

That is until we’re having a bad day!

Failing to say a cheery good morning, checking in on how that big event went yesterday, asking about someone’s weekend or holiday, saying please and thank you – all get noticed when they’re missing, even if subconsciously, leaving people feeling unappreciated.

A sunny smile and a cheerful good morning sets everyone up for the day.

Treat your team with the same care, courtesy and respect as you’d like them to show your customers.

Integrity

How you behave or talk about others when they are not present says a lot about your personal integrity.

Lack of integrity can undermine almost any other effort to create trust with your team. It goes beyond honesty.  Integrity is conforming to the reality of our words – keeping promises and fulfilling expectations.  One way of demonstrating integrity is to be loyal to those who are not present. Confidentiality about others in your team is paramount.

Care

Show you care as much about your team as you do about the business and results.

Listen and observe so you can spot any staff concerns quickly. Left to fester these can snowball into bigger problems.

Help your team stay healthy. Simply ensuring people aren’t expected to work excessively long shifts back to back. Keep an eye out for anyone working excessively long hours or not taking their due days off or full holiday entitlement. It could be an early warning sign.

Provide support when needed and be receptive to when this is required; not everyone will be confident enough to ask for help. If you recognise they need help in areas you feel you don’t have the skills to deal with, support them in seeking help from someone who can.

Commitments

Apologise when you let someone down.

Keep commitments. Do what you say you’ll do. Making a promise that’s important to someone and then not delivering on it suggests lack of respect.

It’s one thing to make a mistake, and quite another not to admit it. Sincere words – “I was wrong”, “I showed you no respect”, “I’m sorry”.  It takes a great deal of character strength to apologise.

Time

If lockdown taught us anything it’s the value of personal time.

Respect people’s personal lives and commitments. Don’t be so hell-bent on people’s contracted hours that you can’t allow somebody that flexibility to alter their hours or do something out of the norm.

Picking up the kids from nursery on time, attending their grandchild’s graduation, tending to a sick relative, attending a one off event that would mean so much to them, allowing time to get ready for a long awaited holiday or special occasion, celebrating personal or family milestones.

If you know these things mean a lot to them, give them that flexibility.

If you only do one thing:

Showing respect for your team is the first step to them respecting you and your business, so always think about what message your actions send to your team about how much you respect them.

Related article: Puffed up with Pride



Creating a Learning Culture

Creating a learning culture

Can we really learn from mistakes?

Creating a learning culture starts with accepting people will make mistakes.

Providing we’re able to spot the mistake, make the effort to understand the mistake and be open to learning from it.

And the same applies with your team.

Let me explain…

I was at a conference recently where one of the talks was on creating a learning culture. To my mind there was one aspect of this which was completely overlooked. And that was to create a learning culture you have to be prepared for people to make mistakes and to help them learn from these. Unless you do, people will not be prepared to try new things or take a chance on taking action for fear of messing up and being blamed – even when they think it’s the right thing to do.

Here are 10 ideas to help in creating a learning culture, one where it’s ok to take a chance and make the odd mistake, so long as you learn from it.

  1. Set the example. Admit when you’ve made a mistake – when you’re open about making mistakes your team will be recognise that everyone makes mistakes. But, make sure you also focus on what’s been learnt as a result of that mistake (see The Emotional Bank Account)
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  2. Demonstrate your trust in team members by giving them responsibility and authority to do what they believe is right. E.g. to respond to customers’ expectations and requests in the way that they see fit. If they truly understand your values and what’s of most importance generally they’ll work out the best route to get there.
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  3. Define what levels of authority your team members have in any given situation, and give them examples of when they need to refer to a manager or get sign off, and when it’s OK for them to make the decision. But when you do have to get involved use this as an opportunity for others to learn from the situation, by explaining your approach and why you approached it in the way you did.
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  4. Build confidence; often people know what they should be doing, but just lack that certainty and confidence to do this really well, so give time and an opportunity for them to practise in a safe environment.
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  5. Listen out for hesitation. When you hear a team member saying  “I can’t…” that might be an indication they are fearful of making a mistake. Talk this through with them to identify any obstacles. Do they have the necessary resources, time, authority, peer support?  Let them know you are still there to support them.
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  6. Don’t expect perfection straight away. People need time to find their own way of doing things, and they shouldn’t feel afraid to make the odd mistake when they initially put principles into practice. Recognise and reward as they improve, even if things are not yet perfect.
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  7. Foster a supportive culture. It should be okay to ask questions and admit they don’t know all the answers, where they’re encouraged to seek out new activities and it’s accepted that people won’t always get things right. Recognise even marginal gains in performance are a step forward.
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  8. Give supportive feedback, and help people see their own mistakes, as well as encouraging them by pointing out what’s gone well. https://www.naturallyloyal.com/giving-effective-feedback/
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  9. Reframing. Get people into the habit of looking for solutions rather than trying to blame others. Asking “what can I do to improve the situation?” “What’s in my control?” Rather than focusing on what’s gone wrong, or seeing it as a failure.
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  10. Think about your emotional states. When you, your team – any of us – are in an unresourceful state (such as anger, exhaustion, boredom) if faced with challenges the tiniest problem can lead us to frustration or aggression; the slightest failure can lead to disappointment, blame or self-doubt; a hint of rejection can lead to defensiveness.

Take action

If you only do one thing towards creating a learning culture…

The next time you or any of your team make a mistake use it as an opportunity to learn from it and move on.

Book recommendation:

Black Box Thinking by Matthew Syed.

An inspiring book about how we cannot grow unless we are prepared to learn from our mistakes, by understanding and overcoming failures and demonstrates how even marginal gains all contribute to success.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Black-Box-Thinking-Surprising-Success/dp/1473613779

Building Confidence Video



Making Changes

making changes

Last week I warned against making lots of changes early on when moving into a new role. However no business stands still and there will times when changes really are necessary. These might be simply to comply with legislation, or respond to customers’ changing expectations, making efficiencies through new technology, or to inject new energy, there comes a time when it’s time to make changes.

People generally don’t like change, particularly when they’ve been doing a job the same way for years. And they object… 

“But, we’ve always done it this way”

When people have been doing things a certain way for any length of time making changes – any changes – can be met with some resistance.

Particularly so when managers or heads of departments are new to the team. and their teams have got used to a certain way of working.

Why does this happen, even when it’s clear it is for the best?

People generally don’t like change.

That can be for a number of reasons. Here are some of them…

  • Unfamiliarity and something new to learn
  • Believing the ‘old’ way is a better way
  • Resentment as they see any change as a criticism of how they do things now
  • Can’t see any benefit of the change
  • Fearing the new way will be more work, difficult to master or they might be exposed
  • Don’t understand what’s expected of them now
  • Believing they’re too old to change their ways

So what can managers do to make changes that will be accepted, embraced, and implemented effectively.

Here are 10 tips to making changes

  1. Vision
    Share you vision of what you want to achieve as a result of the change(s)
  2. WWIFM
    Spell out how it will benefit the individuals concerned (e.g. save time, make the task easier or safer)
  3. Involvement
    Ask the team for their input on what and how to make the changes
  4. Support
    Give all the support, resources and coaching needed to make the change
  5. Early wins
    Start with activities which will result in some quick wins so get the momentum going, and share these amongst the team to help get buy in early on
  6. Consistency
    Ensure everyone in the team is working to the same standards so there are no mixed messages. It only takes one person of influence to derail all your efforts to make change
  7. Incremental changes
    Be patient, and start with small changes over time
  8. Inspect what you expect
    Follow up with your team on how well they are implementing the changes, providing feedback and encouragement, and further support when needed
  9. Embed new habits
    Recognise it takes time for the new way to become habit, so continue to monitor, and give feedback
  10. Communicate – communicate – communicate
    Keep everyone informed of the changes and what these mean to them

If you only do one thing when making changes:

Before you implement changes involve your team in the process to get their ideas on how to achieve the result you want.

Video: Creating a Culture of innovation

Related blog post: Getting employee buy-in



Systems in Management

Systems in management

Systems to help not hinder

How often have we heard the phrase “I’m sorry, the system won’t allow me to do that.”?

Do you have any systems in place which make life difficult for your team members?

Having the right systems, procedures and checklists in place provides consistency, avoids people having to reinvent the wheel, and minimises errors.

However, poor systems can be not only frustrating for team members, but also impact productivity, the customer experience and ultimately your bottom line.

Here are a few to look out for:

  • No system in place for routine tasks so staff reinvent the wheel every time they carry out similar tasks.
  • Not fully understood, so not followed
  • Over complicated or cumbersome
  • Too much red tape or to-ing and fro-ing that slows everything down
  • Unworkable due to lack of time, right equipment, tools, or products

Any of these inevitably puts extra pressure on your team, particularly when there is a direct impact on customers… They are there to support the team, not create red tape, or stifle personality, initiative and good ideas.

Indications that a system needs reviewing include:

  • Team members failing to deliver the job on time
  • When team members frequently struggle, ask for help make mistakes
  • Top causes of customer complaints

It’s easy for us to become oblivious of how ineffective a system works or poor the equipment when we’re not using it every day. So, check the systems and processes you have in place are still doing the job they were designed to do.

If you only do one thing:

Ask your team for their observations and feedback on existing systems and how the system can be improved.

Systems in management Video

I can’t do that 



When I have more time

how to delegate to free up time

One of the easiest ways to gain more time is to delegate.

The reality is that we will never have more time; everyone has the same 1440 minutes in a day, and the same 168 hours in a week.

It’s what we do with that time that counts.

It’s not just how we spend our time that impacts us, but how our team spend their time, too. When they’re not being as productive as you think they should or could be it’s important to stand back and analyse why.

That’s one of the things I see often when working with inexperienced managers. They often get too bogged down in the day-to-day reactive tasks (which really should be carried out by their team members) and thus making very little headway on some of the proactive activities they should be working on to drive things forward.

I find it’s not unusual for newly appointed managers or supervisors to lack confidence in allocating or delegating tasks, for fear of losing control or in case the team member doesn’t do it as well as they would’ve done. Particularly when they have been promoted internally.

However, when they fail to delegate and trust team members to get on with things this can lead to frustration all round. The supervisor has too much to do and ends up with too little time to complete bigger picture and more proactive tasks. Their line manager is frustrated because there is little headway on these proactive activities. And the team members end up feeling undervalued.

Of course, this all has a knock-on effect on the customer too. Even if they don’t sense the frustration amongst the team, they will undoubtedly end up not receiving the best service possible.

If your supervisors are struggling to let go and not sure how to delegate here are 7 ideas and points to review with them.

  1. Get them to identify what they are here for; what things wouldn’t happen if the job didn’t exist. Most people will give you a list of the tasks or activities that won’t get completed. Let them give you this list but then go back and get them to identify the outcomes of those activities. For example: an activity might be conducting monthly 1:1 meetings with each of their team members, one of the outcomes of which is for team members to feel valued, ultimately contributing to their level of engagement and productivity.
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  2. Ask them to track and then analyse a day’s activity. Of all of the activities they completed during the day how many of these and what proportion of time was spent on things that only they could do, and that contributed to what they’re there for. Then get them to identify all the things that in a perfect world could be delegated to somebody else. See if there are any activities left, that really don’t need to be done at all.
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  3. Explain to them the difference between importance and urgency (ref: Stephen R. Covey ~ The 7 Habits Of Highly Effective People). Help them identify examples of tasks which are non-urgent but important (QII activities). Then get them to break down these activities into the smallest possible denominator, so they can identify which tasks could be delegated, and schedule in the rest, so they can be chipping away at these QII activities.
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  4. Ask them to identify what holds them back with delegating; for them to be as honest as possible. Their responses might include: fear of losing control, reluctance to give up the tasks they enjoy, thinking it will be quicker to do it themselves, they’re not confident team members are capable, they’re afraid they’re going to get a negative response when they ask, they don’t want to overburden anyone.
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  5. Help them identify what can be gained if they were to delegate more tasks: free up time for proactive tasks, develop and/or stretch team members, the job might get done more quickly, more cheaply, and maybe even done better!
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  6. Before delegating anything, get them to prepare, by thinking through the purpose of the task, how it will be measured, what this person will need to carry it out effectively, and how it will be followed up. Here’s a delegation checklist I use with inexperienced managers and supervisors to help them to delegate by really thinking it through in advance. They won’t need this every time, but it helps focus their mind on what they need to consider beforehand.
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  7. Monitoring and measurement is an area where you might have extremes. Some newly appointed managers are so nervous about letting go, they hover the whole time and never give the person a chance to get on with it. But at the other end of the spectrum, you might have managers who simply make the assumption that everything is on track, and don’t do enough to monitor or follow-up that the task of been completed, as requested.

Letting go is a gradual process, and any inexperienced manager or supervisor will need time to build up their confidence before they will trust their team members to get on with the task in hand. So, in the same way you would expect them to review and follow-up with tasks they have allocated, you’ll need to do the same with them to build up their confidence and skill.

If you only do one thing: Observe your managers and supervisors for an hour and see how many tasks they perform which could easily be done by someone else in their team, and discuss with them one task or activity they could delegate to give them more time.

p.s. If you’d like some help training your first line managers how to delegate set up a call with me here, via my online diary


Building Confidence

building confidenceBuilding confidence with team members as they return to work

As your team return to work, you may need to do some confidence building. If they’ve been on furlough or working from home for some time, the may need some reassurance once they return, either to their old duties, or new tasks which are now part of their role.

Whether it’s because they’ve not done something for a while, or you’re introducing something new or a different way of doing things is bound to feel a bit clunky to begin with.

And when you need to make changes to the way they do things it takes even longer to get used to the new way.

Human nature says we’ll always take the path of least resistance, so the slightest obstacle will send people back to their old comfortable way of doing it.

However, sometimes there can be a real reluctance even to have a go. There might be a number of reasons for this. But often it’s just down to a lack of confidence, especially if the new way of doing things involves a degree of risk or difficulty, at least from the employee’s perspective.

And longer term a lack of confidence will stop them getting on with tasks off their own bat, which can be both frustrating and draining for you, and have a knock on effect for colleagues and customers alike.

Here are 7 ways you can build confidence in your team members, and prevent this happening in your team:

1. Play to people’s strengths.

It’s a lot easier for you to allocate responsibility for tasks where people already excel, and the likelihood is when they are good at that task they’ll be confident and probably enjoy it.

You might need to look for the capabilities in others that they themselves may not see and help them to see these for themselves. Focusing on strengths not only boosts confidence, it enables people to shine and excel. It means complementing potential shortcomings of others in the team, contributing unique value in the eyes of colleagues and customers.

That doesn’t mean to say you don’t develop people in other areas, but avoid the temptation to make everyone mediocre at everything.

2. Establish expectations

People hate not fully understanding what’s expected of them; it can leave them hesitant and fearful of making mistakes.

It’s inevitable that some ways of working and duties will have changed. If there are duties that used to be part of their role that are now less of a priority, explain why this is. If these were tasks they did well or took a particular pride in doing, be sensitive to how you handle this, so they don’t get the impression that their previous efforts were not appreciated.

If it’s a new task ensure they understand the significance of the task, and set a clear and simple objective, and what controls such as budget, deadline, when and how any review will take place. Bear in mind, it may take them longer to begin with as people get into the task.

3. Empower

People soon pick it up if you don’t trust them or are reluctant to allocate any responsibility to them, leaving them doubting their own abilities.

Demonstrate trust by letting go. No one wants their boss breathing down their neck the whole time, and it’s frustrating for everyone when team members have to get sign off for everything.

Cut the red tape and give your team the freedom to do what they think is in the best interests of the customer.

Set clear boundaries so they understand the exceptions and when you really do need to be involved.

3. Give flexibility

Allow each of your team to adapt and adopt their own style and let them bring their own personality to the role, particularly when dealing with customers.

If they know the end result you’re looking for they often come up with better ways to get the same result.

4. Develop ‘experts’

Give ownership for areas that require specialist knowledge, so this team member becomes the go to person for this. When individuals have one or two areas to focus on specifically it encourages them to go deeper and develop their expertise, and encourages continuous improvement. This in turn can have an impact on your customer experience, when specific knowledge is required to gain the customer’s confidence.

This is not only good for people’s development it also helps the team respect other’s roles and share the burden.

5. Reassure

Let them know you are there to support them, and to come to you with later question, concerns or suggestions. Reassure them of your commitment to their safety and ongoing support.

Encourage your team by assuring them that they have the skills and knowledge. If you really are unsure of somebody’s ability to deliver what’s needed reflect on what help and support they would need in order to achieve this and focus on that instead.

Build confidence by providing positive feedback and recognition. Offer plenty of support and encouragement.

6. Learn from mistakes

When things go wrong this can knock people’s confidence. Foster a supportive culture where people can learn from their mistakes, rather than be blamed.

Encourage everyone to come forward when things haven’t gone to plan, or when there’s been a near miss. Then focus on how to avoid this happening again, not just for that team member, but for anyone else in the team.

Ask your team member(s) for their suggestions. Nine times out of ten they’ll work out for themselves the best way to avoid a repercussion.

Recognise when any improvements are made, even if things are not yet perfect!

7. Celebrate and reward success

Celebrate success so you encourage more of the same.

Establish regular opportunities and events to enable others to share their successes and achievements. This could be as simple as daily briefings where individuals talk about their successes and what others can learn from these, but add more weight to this by publicly recognising their success e.g. sharing achievements with your guests or entering them for awards.

Highlight how individual contributions have had a positive impact on the business as a whole. Recognise and reward individuals, departments or the team as a whole to demonstrate how you value their successes.

In summary

Building confidence in your team starts by demonstrating your trust. Empower individuals and the team by giving them authority to make decisions and take action. Generate a climate of confidence by drawing attention to the strengths of the team and individuals and where they complement one another rather than dwelling on shortcomings.

Related content

Blog: Learn from mistakes 

Video: How people learn

LinkedIn share

 


Using the Coaching model GROW

coaching model

Using a coaching model in managing performance

In last week’s managing performance masterclass one of the principles we discussed was to identify when your team need support. One indication of this is when they say “I can’t do this” or after the event when they say “I didn’t have time”.

There can be many reasons someone doesn’t perform to standard and these might include

  • lack the skills and appropriate training
  • inadequate resources or tools
  • not enough time due to too much to do or staff shortages
  • they have not been given authority or access to everything they need
  • mixed messages from management about what they should be doing

But despite having everything they need it doesn’t necessarily mean they can do the task to standard, or do it at all!

Why?

Reasons may include, for example

  • They lack confidence in their ability or worried they will make a mistake
  • They are approaching the task the wrong way
  • They are cutting corners or rushing things so making silly mistakes

Coaching may be the answer.

How is this different to training?

With coaching you are helping the team member to come up with their own solutions.

It can help people tap into what they already know and find their own solutions. So if someone is struggling to apply a new skill, or simply making mistakes with a task they’ve been able to do ok in the past, coaching might well be the answer to identify what’s standing in the way and how to improve performance.

Probably one of the most widely known coaching models is GROW.

GROW stands for GOAL, REALITY, OPTIONS and WILL

It is not appropriate for every situation, but can be used to great effect to tap into people’s existing knowledge and experience and develop potential.

It is based on the principle that the ‘coach’ asks questions and draws the answer from the ‘coachee’ or team member.

This leads to increased awareness, better buy in and commitment, increases confidence and is good development.

Goal

Setting the overall coaching objectives and the goals for the coaching session. Goals need to be SMART*. There may two types of goal – one long term goal, then a short term goal for this discussion. Goals need to focus on what will be observed or happening once it is achieved.

In the case of when someone’s performance has dropped the GOAL would be to raise the level of performance to the set standard. Help them identify what good looks like, which might include how if feels for them when they are achieving this. Watch out for abstract words such as ‘confidence‘ or ‘improve‘ as they are subjective; ensure you are both clear what these mean. (see ‘Fluff Busting’ article here)

Reality

Checking and raising awareness of the situation right now. This brings out the employee’s perception of the situation, which can sometimes be very different from the manager’s. It is important that you don’t make assumptions about what is happening, even if you think you already know! It is important to get a full a picture as possible about what is happening to get to the root of the problem.

Options

Finding alternative strategies, solutions, answers. This is usually the hardest part for the manager acting as coach, as it is all too easy to give the answers or make suggestions. This means the employee will continue to be dependent on you to come up with solutions and not have to think for themselves. It is far more rewarding for the employee to come up with their own solutions.

And they will be far more committed to acting on solutions that they themselves have identified

Will

There’s a big difference between saying what you CAN do and what you WILL do!

We’ve all been to meetings when there has been a lot of talk and ideas and then you meet again a few weeks later and nothing has happened. The same will happen following a coaching discussion if there is no summing up of the course of action, and commitment from the employee to take action.

So it’s important to test the team member’s commitment to action by making concrete, realistic plans to reach it. This may involve flushing out any barriers or concerns, so they don’t get in the way and become an excuse for failing to take action.

The GROW coaching model

This format works well for day to day discussions in supporting your team in their work, as well as more formal one to one discussions on performance, objective setting, and development planning. It also gives a structure to use in team meetings for group problem solving.

If you only do one thing:

Next time you have a discussion with one of your team on what they need to do to resolve a problem, before you just tell them what to do, stop and consider if they could come up with the solution themselves by exploring each of these 4 questions.

An alternative version of SMART goals 


How are you doing?

Listen radio12th and final post in my 12 days of Christmas mini blog series

12. How are you doing?

Ask your team for feedback on how you are doing in their eyes. It can feel uncomfortable to give feedback to the boss, so ask in a more conversational way such as “What could I be doing to make your job easier?”

Be brave. We don’t always want to hear about the things that frustrate your team, particularly if you may be contributing to the problem! Be open to the truth and willing to listen.

Create the opportunity for people to give anonymous feedback. People may be afraid to say what they really think if they’re concerned about being labelled a problem or complainer.

Ask for feedback regularly. Things change and problems can fester.

Accept feedback with good grace, and thank them for an honest response. Address concerns. This doesn’t mean that you have to resolve every personal whim, but it means identifying trends, recurring problems or prioritising what needs attention.

Communicate progress. If people have taken the time to let you know how they feel let them know what and how you are addressing any issues or following through on their suggestions.

Action point:

If you consider yourself to be a brave, caring owner of a growth focused business, I think you’ll be fascinated by this FREE assessment.

Get your company’s engagement score on 10 minutes or less.

https://www.engagementmultiplier.com/en-gb/partner/naturallyloyal/

It only takes 10 minutes (or less) to get your company’s engagement score, and discover where to take action to make an impact right away.



Setting Expectations

setting expectations

If you're about to reopen or to launch your Christmas offerings it's important to set expectations. The chances are some responsibilities and priorities will have changed, so your team need to know what's expected.

Determine what needs doing, who is best placed to do it and then set your expectations.

This is something I always discuss on my management programmes, as it's all to easy to assume people know what's expected of them. But when there's any doubt it leads to confusion, tasks getting left undone or wasted time and energy on the wrong tasks or done in the wrong way.

All of which leads to frustration on your part and becomes demotivating for your team.

A little time spent up front will avoid this. 

So here is my

7 step guide to setting expectations

...to help you ensure nothing gets missed or taken for granted.

Setting expectations might not need much time at each of these stages, but at least consider them before leaving team members just to get on with the task how they see fit.

1. What tasks ~ Make a shopping list of everything that needs doing:

  • What new practices and procedures are in place
  • What new or amended offerings or service are you now providing that require new ways of working
  • What tasks normally performed by people who are still on furlough need to be covered by someone else
  • Which task which would have been routine pre lockdown are no longer a priority

2. Who ~ Select the best person for the task

  • Not necessarily the one with the best skills or the most time. There may be good reason for allocating some tasks to a less than perfect candidate to develop their skills in areas where they are weak
  • Often what people lack in experience and skill, they may more than make up for in potential and motivation

3. Why

  • Set a clear and simple objective for the task. It should build confidence, develop and stretch, not break the person or be considered an ‘offload’
  • Discuss the assignment and, importantly, how the task fits into the big picture, why it’s important for the business
  • Explain why you’ve chosen the person for the task

4. How

  • Check for understanding and ask for ideas
  • Provide guidance - not ‘how to’ do the task - but all the necessary facts, possible approaches, expected results

5. Where and when

  • Make a ‘contract’ establishing resources available, how often you will follow-up, how performance will be measured
  • Establish controls - budget, deadline, when and how any review will take place

6. Let them get on with it

  • Allocate, then trust them to get on with it. Make yourself available, particularly at critical times, but let them decide whether, and whenever, they need your help and guidance
  • Let everyone know who is responsible for what tasks so there is no stepping on toes, or tasks that fall through the cracks

7. Evaluate and feedback

  • Encourage self-evaluation – they’ll normally be able to work out for themselves how they’ve done
  • Concentrate on:
  • What worked well (giving praise for a job done well)
  • What they’d do differently (identify lessons learned not only for the person but for yourself too!)

We also discussed the longer term goal, but more on that next week.

Take action on setting expectations

If you only do one thing: make a plan of who is best suited to which task.

Related article:  https://www.naturallyloyal.com/old-habits/

Related video: https://youtu.be/546C4nilsxc



Attitude problems?

Attitude problems

A is for Attitude

I often hear managers criticising a team member’s attitude, “they have an attitude problem!” But what do they actually mean? What behaviours convey someone’s attitude? Often it’s their enthusiasm for the job, the way they support their colleagues, how they talk to customers.

But, before considering your team’s attitude, let’s consider yours!

How much of your team’s attitude stems from the example you set?

Let me ask you…

When you get home from work can you normally sense what sort of mood everyone else is in? Even when no words are spoken it’s usually pretty easy to tell. Your moods and emotions are normally evident to others from your behaviours, facial expressions and tone.

Of course the current situation is affecting us all, and I know how difficult it can be for some to remain positive when there is so much uncertainty and things out of your control.

But, like it or not, your mood has a profound impact on the mood of all those around you. Not just your team, but suppliers and customers; all of whom are probably looking for guidance and reassurance.

It influences your team’s attitude, their enthusiasm, their willingness to take responsibility, their confidence in you and the business and their loyalty towards you.

In turn, this certainly influences your customers’ perception of you and your team, their level of engagement and ultimately their loyalty to your business.

Rather than wasting energy on those things completely out of your control, focus on what you can control.

Being positive, enthusiastic and energetic might not always rub off on everyone else, but it’s a better bet to energise, engage and motivate your team than if you’re down and focusing on things you can’t control.

Lead by example and be a role model. If you are all doom and gloom this inevitably rubs off on your team and in turn, your customers too.

As Zig Zigler said “A positive attitude won’t help you do anything, but it will help you do everything better than a bad attitude will.

Take action

A little exercise I like to do and have shared with many of my clients to help stay focused on the positives, is to write down at the end of each day what you’re GLAD of:

G something you’re grateful for, however small

L something you’ve learnt today

A something you’ve achieved today

D something that’s delighted you, or you’ve done to delight others

p.s. If you want to follow the whole A-Z series subscribe to my YouTube channel so you don’t miss a thing:

related article: Attitude over aptitude