Tag Archives: building confidence

Building Confidence

building confidenceBuilding confidence with team members as they return to work

As your team return to work, you may need to do some confidence building. If they’ve been on furlough or working from home for some time, the may need some reassurance once they return, either to their old duties, or new tasks which are now part of their role.

Whether it’s because they’ve not done something for a while, or you’re introducing something new or a different way of doing things is bound to feel a bit clunky to begin with.

And when you need to make changes to the way they do things it takes even longer to get used to the new way.

Human nature says we’ll always take the path of least resistance, so the slightest obstacle will send people back to their old comfortable way of doing it.

However, sometimes there can be a real reluctance even to have a go. There might be a number of reasons for this. But often it’s just down to a lack of confidence, especially if the new way of doing things involves a degree of risk or difficulty, at least from the employee’s perspective.

And longer term a lack of confidence will stop them getting on with tasks off their own bat, which can be both frustrating and draining for you, and have a knock on effect for colleagues and customers alike.

Here are 7 ways you can build confidence in your team members, and prevent this happening in your team:

1. Play to people’s strengths.

It’s a lot easier for you to allocate responsibility for tasks where people already excel, and the likelihood is when they are good at that task they’ll be confident and probably enjoy it.

You might need to look for the capabilities in others that they themselves may not see and help them to see these for themselves. Focusing on strengths not only boosts confidence, it enables people to shine and excel. It means complementing potential shortcomings of others in the team, contributing unique value in the eyes of colleagues and customers.

That doesn’t mean to say you don’t develop people in other areas, but avoid the temptation to make everyone mediocre at everything.

2. Establish expectations

People hate not fully understanding what’s expected of them; it can leave them hesitant and fearful of making mistakes.

It’s inevitable that some ways of working and duties will have changed. If there are duties that used to be part of their role that are now less of a priority, explain why this is. If these were tasks they did well or took a particular pride in doing, be sensitive to how you handle this, so they don’t get the impression that their previous efforts were not appreciated.

If it’s a new task ensure they understand the significance of the task, and set a clear and simple objective, and what controls such as budget, deadline, when and how any review will take place. Bear in mind, it may take them longer to begin with as people get into the task.

3. Empower

People soon pick it up if you don’t trust them or are reluctant to allocate any responsibility to them, leaving them doubting their own abilities.

Demonstrate trust by letting go. No one wants their boss breathing down their neck the whole time, and it’s frustrating for everyone when team members have to get sign off for everything.

Cut the red tape and give your team the freedom to do what they think is in the best interests of the customer.

Set clear boundaries so they understand the exceptions and when you really do need to be involved.

3. Give flexibility

Allow each of your team to adapt and adopt their own style and let them bring their own personality to the role, particularly when dealing with customers.

If they know the end result you’re looking for they often come up with better ways to get the same result.

4. Develop ‘experts’

Give ownership for areas that require specialist knowledge, so this team member becomes the go to person for this. When individuals have one or two areas to focus on specifically it encourages them to go deeper and develop their expertise, and encourages continuous improvement. This in turn can have an impact on your customer experience, when specific knowledge is required to gain the customer’s confidence.

This is not only good for people’s development it also helps the team respect other’s roles and share the burden.

5. Reassure

Let them know you are there to support them, and to come to you with later question, concerns or suggestions. Reassure them of your commitment to their safety and ongoing support.

Encourage your team by assuring them that they have the skills and knowledge. If you really are unsure of somebody’s ability to deliver what’s needed reflect on what help and support they would need in order to achieve this and focus on that instead.

Build confidence by providing positive feedback and recognition. Offer plenty of support and encouragement.

6. Learn from mistakes

When things go wrong this can knock people’s confidence. Foster a supportive culture where people can learn from their mistakes, rather than be blamed.

Encourage everyone to come forward when things haven’t gone to plan, or when there’s been a near miss. Then focus on how to avoid this happening again, not just for that team member, but for anyone else in the team.

Ask your team member(s) for their suggestions. Nine times out of ten they’ll work out for themselves the best way to avoid a repercussion.

Recognise when any improvements are made, even if things are not yet perfect!

7. Celebrate and reward success

Celebrate success so you encourage more of the same.

Establish regular opportunities and events to enable others to share their successes and achievements. This could be as simple as daily briefings where individuals talk about their successes and what others can learn from these, but add more weight to this by publicly recognising their success e.g. sharing achievements with your guests or entering them for awards.

Highlight how individual contributions have had a positive impact on the business as a whole. Recognise and reward individuals, departments or the team as a whole to demonstrate how you value their successes.

In summary

Building confidence in your team starts by demonstrating your trust. Empower individuals and the team by giving them authority to make decisions and take action. Generate a climate of confidence by drawing attention to the strengths of the team and individuals and where they complement one another rather than dwelling on shortcomings.

Related content

Blog: Learn from mistakes 

Video: How people learn

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Misery loves company

misery loves companyAre you a glass half full or glass half empty type of person?

We are now exactly half way through the year. So while on the subject of halves are you more inclined to be saying “Gosh, where did that time go, half the year has gone already!” or “Hooray, we’ve still got half the year to go!

In this context being ‘half empty’ it may provide the motivation we need to take action on a goal, but in many cases the ‘glass half empty’ approach can be appear negative, demotivating and demoralising.

I’m sure we can all relate to the type of person who constantly looks at the downside of everything; the type of person who drains your energy and your enthusiasm the whole time; the ‘Mood Hoovers’ who have the ability to suck the life out of everything.

But…

Have you ever stopped to think about whether you ever have this impact on those around you, and in particular your team?

We all have our off days. Your football team lost last night, you had a row with your spouse this morning, someone cut you up in traffic on your way in, you’re fed up with the lousy weather, your boss has just set you an unrealistic deadline, or the topic on everyone’s lips at the moment… you’re worried about the impact of Brexit on you or your business.

Like it or not, your mood has a profound impact on the mood of all those around you. It influences your team’s attitude, their enthusiasm, their willingness to take responsibility, their confidence in you and the business and their loyalty towards you.

And in turn this certainly influences your customers’ perception of you and your team, their level of engagement and ultimately their loyalty to your business.

It’s important you remain self-motivated even when things are not going well; are you prone to displaying your frustration, doubts or hesitation; and resort to using negative language, expressing doubt in your own or others’ ability? In short, do you act as a role model for your team to follow?

Behaviour breeds behaviour

When you get home from work can you normally sense what sort of mood everyone else is in? Even when no words are spoken it’s usually pretty easy to tell. Our moods and emotions are usually evident to others from our behaviours, facial expressions and tone.

Certain emotions or unresourceful states will inevitably have a knock-on impact on everyone around us – family, friends, colleagues and customers alike. Such as miserable, worried, angry, bored, frustrated, resistant, confused, irritated, flustered, tired, impatient, or distracted.

When you, your team – any of us – are in these unresourceful states if faced with challenges: the tiniest problem can lead us to frustration or aggression; the slightest failure can lead to disappointment, blame or self-doubt; a hint of rejection can lead to anger or defensiveness.

If you want your team to be: enthusiastic, flexible, motivated, interested, confident, energetic, happy, welcoming, and friendly this has to start with you.

And from a position of these resourceful states we’ll much more readily find solutions to problems, learn from our failures and bounce back from rejection.

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Old habits die hard

Dont forgetYou know that frustration you feel when you ask someone in your team to do something differently, and although you know they know what to do for some reason they just don’t do it!

I managed to stall my car twice yesterday!

Not because I don’t know how to drive. It’s simply that I’d got out of the habit of changing gear, as I’d been driving an automatic for the past 18 months.

And it can be no different in the workplace. When you have not done something for a while people get out of the habit. So when you need them to go back to a previous way (maybe back to a standard that has recently slipped, or wasn’t such a priority for a while) you might need to build up people’s confidence again and start re-establishing the habit.

Of course when you stall the car you get instant feedback that you’re doing it wrong! But in the workplace it might be a little less obvious.

This doesn’t mean to say that you need to retrain people, but they night need a little bit of a helping hand, some feedback and maybe some coaching to get them back on track. And then keep an eye on them until the habit is firmly installed.



Building Confidence in Service Skills

confidenceTo get a return on our investment in customer service training we need to build the confidence of the team.

People who feel they will be praised for good results are more likely to do tasks willingly in the first place. And far more likely to try out new skills if they know they’ll be supported even if they make a mistake.

They soon pick it up when you fail to trust or allocate any responsibility to them, leaving them doubting their own abilities. Lack of confidence will prevent them getting on with things off their own bat, which can be both frustrating and draining for you.

And ultimately for your customers too.

Build confidence by providing positive feedback and recognition. Offer plenty of support and encouragement. Remind everyone of the importance and significance of what they do.

Foster a supportive culture where people can learn from their mistakes, rather than be blamed. Encourage everyone to come forward with their own areas of improvement and how they will achieve these.

Recognise and reward when these improvements have been made even if things are not yet perfect!

Ask your team for their feedback too, and show them you value their suggestions and ideas. Many of your team are much closer to your customers than you are and will see opportunities to enhance the customer experience. So ask for their ideas and be prepared to act on them.

Celebrate success so you encourage more of the same.