Tag Archives: performance reviews

Getting your team on board for their performance reviews.

Getting them on board for a staff one to one.

One to ones should be a two way discussion. Ask open questions to get their ideas on performance and how to move forward.

When giving feedback on their performance use the AID model:

  • A  Action what they did – i.e. what you have seen or heard (back this up with examples, focus on actions not on your interpretation or their intentions)
  • I  Impact – what has that achieved, or what impact has it had on the business, the department, the guests, or themselves
  • D  Development – what can they do to build on this, or do differently to improve or perfect, and how you can support them

Ask for their views, not only on their performance, but what support they need, what could be improved in the business, what feedback they have had from guests, their suggestions for future objectives. And be prepared to listen to their answers and probe for more detail or examples if you need to so you fully understand what they are saying.

Remember, if people’s previous experience of one to one meetings up till now has been bad or at best just a waste of time, it can take time to build trust before these can be totally honest exchanges. Start by asking the questions above, or similar, and use this as a starting point to get the discussions going.

 

Where to begin

If you aren’t already conducting regular one to ones now might be a good time to start. Use your first meeting to establish (jointly) their goals and KPIs if you don’t already have these in place.

Begin with the end in mind.

As it the nearly the end of the week this is the best place to start, get your diary out and start booking you and your staff in on Monday.


Planning your team one to ones.

What’s on the agenda for your staff one to ones.

The agenda doesn’t need to be written in tablets of stone, but it’s good to follow a basic structure so you both know what to expect and can plan accordingly. Linking back to your objectives there are some key elements to include, all of which can be structured around the questions yesterday. It’s far better to home in on one or two areas at each meeting so you can go into some depth, than covering everything superficially and covering the same ground each time.

What have they achieved towards pre-determined goals, targets, KPIs, etc.

How have they gone about this – this is where you might also look at their behaviours too. It’s all very well achieving all their targets if they have upset colleagues or guests along the way.

What needs to be focused on or addressed, and what support or development do they need to do this

A summing up and agreement on actions moving forward, with some measurable goals and clear direction

 

Time and place

One to ones should be scheduled so both of you can plan for them and around them, and fully prepare. And nothing smacks more of “I’m not valued” than one to one meetings being continually cancelled for the slightest reason.

I’m often asked how often and how long should they be. There is no hard and fast rule, but allow on average a minimum of an hour per month per person, longer for roles with more responsibility. So if you conduct them monthly then set aside at least an hour for each, plus preparation time. If logistics mean that you can only meet once every 2 months, then allow two hours.

Either way allow sufficient time so that neither of you are rushed or distracted by imposing deadlines e.g. prior to your main service times for F&B staff. Think also of their state of mind at the end of a very busy shift.

Avoid the fish bowl type of office or public areas. You want a free and open discussion, and you’ll not get this when there’s a fear they’ll be over heard or others can see their reactions to any sensitive issues raised.

Now the scene has been set for a really good one to one, now all you need to do is to get them on board with it too, and this is what you will read about tomorrow.


Do you dread staff one to one review meetings?

Why are ‘One to Ones’ so valuable for you, your staff, and your business…..?

1to1 reviews do you dread your review meetings

Some see staff 1:1 reviews simply as a chore. Never under estimate the impact of sitting down with each member of staff on a one to one basis.

A good starting point to get the best from them has to be identifying what you want to achieve from the meetings.

Your aim should be to motivate your team members to either continue or sustain good performance and to feel confident that they have the ability and support to fill any gaps where they need development.

It’s an opportunity for them to have their contribution recognised – not just performance, but have their ideas heard. And finally it devotes time to set direction and goals for the coming weeks.

The net result should be an enthused and motivated employee who knows what they should be focusing on, and how this will contribute to the business.

Finding the time for your staff one to ones.

One of the common concerns I hear is that the process is time consuming, particularly when you have 8 – 10 people reporting to you. Well, ask yourself this – how much time potentially will you need to spend rectifying things if you don’t take that time out with them?

I often hear of managers spending literally hours preparing for the meetings, then finding themselves having to work twice as hard to get the employee to contribute their ideas and views to the meeting. One to ones are as much for their benefit as yours, so ask them to take some responsibility too for the preparation.

3 questions

There may be things they’ve done that are worthy of comment, which you are oblivious to; remember you don’t see them every minute of every day they are at work. So ask them to plan what they would like to discuss. As a minimum you may like to consider these 3 questions:

  1. What successes or achievements have you had this month or what have you done this month that you’re proud of?
  2. What disappointments or frustrations? Or if you had a magic wand, what would you change or do differently?
  3. What do you feel needs to be your number 1 focus for the coming month?

You don’t need to use this wording, but you get the gist.

Their preparation obviously doesn’t let you off the hook altogether, but if they are well prepared it will certainly reduce the amount of time needed in the meeting to achieve the same result.

The preparation is key for these meetings, so in the next post you can read my thoughts on how to ensure a good agenda and the right environment which helps with the process of getting on track for a good meeting.

Continue to the next post for tips on planning your one to ones…