Tag Archives: Team meetings

Celebrate Success !

Celebrate your Success

Celebrate and reward success

Establish regular opportunities and events to enable others to share their successes and achievements. This could be as simple as team meetings where individuals talk about their successes and what others can learn from these, but add more weight to this by publicly recognising their success e.g. sharing achievements with your guests or entering them for awards. Highlight how individual contributions have had a positive impact on the business as a whole, and be open and optimistic about business performance.
Recognise and reward individuals, departments or the team as a whole to demonstrate how you value their successes.  So if you were to ask your team if they believed you see the glass as half empty or half full, what response would you get?

 

Join me on the FREE recording from my recent tele seminar on how to get the best from your team


Hanging onto Talent ~ Part 5

Keep talking

Give constructive feedback -what have they done well and how it has contributed; where they have fallen short and how this can be improved.

Communication is a two-way process, not only do people need to know what’s going on, they want to be heard. Daily briefings need to include what’s happening that could affect the operation or the customer experience in any way (e.g. maintenance, staff shortages, unavailable products or services), as well as any feedback from staff on their observations or ideas. Let your team know how the business is performing, and what this means to them.

Having a happy and motivated team will not only help you retain your talent and reduce staff turnover, but will lead to better productivity and customer service, maintaining sales and controlling costs.

If you want to retain your best people you need to give them what they want.

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Hanging onto Talent ~ Part 4

What if you are the problem?

We may not want to admit it, but you or your management team may be the reason that people leave. Rather than hide your head in the sand, reflect on what you need to do to change. Find out what are the things that people find difficult or frustrating about working for you or with you, and then figure out a way to change your approach before others decide to jump ship.

How much direction do you provide? Do people know exactly what’s expected of them, and have the tools, time and resources to deliver? Lead by example so there are no mixed messages.

Ensure that you and your management team are approachable. Provide support when it’s needed, and be receptive to when this is required. Not everyone will be confident enough to ask for help. Consult staff and listen to their ideas; they may be able to offer better ways of doing things.

Take time to talk to staff to build relationships and show an interest in them as individuals. Listen to and act quickly on any concerns. Identify what’s important to them recognising that with the varied cultures and backgrounds of your staff that their values and priorities may sometimes be different to your own.

In the final part tomorrow will discuss the impact good communication with your team.

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Hanging onto Talent ~ Part 3

Insecurity

I’ve worked with a number of businesses recently who have had to make cuts and changes. This makes people uncomfortable, and so when another opportunity comes along, they jump at the chance if they feel it has better long term security.

Communicate any changes that are happening in the business before they happen, and how this might affect them.

Set standards so that people know what’s expected of them, and can measure their own performance, and not left in doubt about their contribution.  Be consistent, ensuring the same ‘rules’ apply to everyone. Focus on telling people what you want to achieve, i.e. the end result, rather than dictating how to do it.  This gives people flexibility to adopt their own style (you’ll be surprised how often they end up improving the process) rather than living in fear of not being able to comply with strict processes.  And make sure you provide the appropriate tools, resources and training to do the job effectively.

Training your staff in the mechanics of the business operation puts them in a better position to contribute to cost control and income generation. If people understand how the business makes its money they are then in a position to contribute to this and put forward their own ideas. A win-win for both.

Tomorrow we’ll look at whether you or your management team may be the reason that people leave your hotel.

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Hanging onto Talent ~ Part 2

Recognition and reward

When staff leave, if the reason they give is more money look to see how your rates compare with the competition (bearing in mind for some roles your competitor for staff may be in totally different industries). But also look at what benefits your staff are getting that they may not be getting elsewhere and ensure people are aware of everything that makes up their package.

What about the less tangible aspects of their package. Recognise and reward performance and achievements. Celebrate and share successes; identify and utilise people strengths, training, delegating and giving them control and ownership where appropriate. Be sure to recognise all departments, including back of house staff, e.g. housekeeping is often the most undervalued department, but is commonly the most profitable aspect of a hotel.

Encourage and reward loyalty by conducting regular pay/benefits reviews. Think about incentives that are within reach of any member of staff who performs well. This might mean focusing on a different theme each month so that everyone has an opportunity to be recognised for their particular skills or strengths.

Career and prospects

If they’re moving for career progression, is this something that you could have given them but just didn’t make them aware of the opportunities? What can you do in future to ensure that all your team get the recognition and development they need for their career progression?

Grow from within where possible, and give people the opportunity for career progression as well is enhancing the skills to do their existing job. Think also about life skills; for example offering English lessons. And make use of the training grants available through the tourist organisations, colleges, and government-funded schemes.

You won’t be able to accommodate everyone’s aspirations particularly if you’re a small hotel, but having some kind of succession plan in place does give people something to work towards. However, be careful you don’t make promises that you are unable to keep.

Make training a part of day-to-day management, so it’s not seen as something that is additional or optional. This goes for both staff and supervisors/managers. Identify those who have an interest in developing their CV and are willing to take on training responsibilities as part of their own development.

Tomorrow will look at the impact of changes in your hotel business and how to minimise the disruption this brings.

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Hanging onto Talent ~ Part 1

We already know that there is a lack of new talent entering the industry so it’s important that we hang on to our best people. The hospitality industry has always had one of the highest labour turnover rates in all sectors of the economy, so are we just deluding ourselves if we think we can beat that trend? Well maybe there are a few things we can all be doing to tip the balance in our favour.

Each day this week I’ll be posting steps you can take to hang on to your hotel’s talent.

Why do they quit?

Staff turnover can be infectious, the more people come and go, the easier it is for others to make the decision to leave. Unless we understand why staff leave it’s unlikely we’ll reverse the trend.

In an ideal world some kind of confidential exit interview should be conducted and wherever possible this is best done by someone other than a line manager. Let’s face it, if the reason is it’s poor management or leadership that has prompted the move, it’s unlikely that you’re going to learn the whole truth if the line manager is asking the question! The saying goes people don’t quit jobs they quit bosses. But even if your staff structure doesn’t allow for this it is important to find out as much as possible about people’s motives for leaving.

Tomorrow we look at how we can use recognition and reward, and career prospects to help retain our best people.

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Solving an Issue

Here are two sets of questions to use to solve a problem or issue.

Take your problem and work through the first set of questions.

  1. What is the problem?
  2. How long have you had it?
  3. Whose fault is it?
  4. Who is to blame?
  5. What is your worst experience with this problem?
  6. Why haven’t you solved it yet?

How do you feel? Probably not very positive or motivated to do much about the problem!

 

Now work through the problem using the following set of questions.

  1. What do you want instead of the issue?
  2. How will you know when you’ve achieved it?
  3. How can it be solved?
  4. Who can help you reach this objective quickly?
  5. What resources will help?
  6. What can be learnt from this matter?

 

How do you feel about the problem this time around?

The first set of questions all look at directing blame.

The second set are aiming to resolve the problem.

These are great questions to ask your team when asking them to look for solutions to problems. Try using them in one to ones or team meetings when problem solving, and see what results you get.

 

Involving your team in problem solving is key to effective leadership, and the skills needed will be covered in detail in my forthcoming online leadership coaching programme


Regular update meetings

Do your hotel staff know the score? ~ Part 3

Regular meetings – weekly, fortnightly or monthly give an opportunity to:

  • Share ideas
  • Give and get updates on what’s happening across departments, to encourage teamwork
  • How the business is performing at operational level and any changes necessary or areas of focus
  • Changes happening in the business and how these might affect staff (before they happened and the rumours take over)
  • Give regular on going training or development

These type of meetings need to be two-way, (not the type of’ town hall’ address) and an opportunity for your team to have their say and put forward their ideas and suggestions. You may be pleasantly surprised at how resourceful they can be in finding solutions to problems. Often they add a fresh perspective.

Tomorrow we’ll cover one to one meetings.

Communication was one of the topics covered in “How to Give Your Hotel a Competitive Edge” series of interviews.

 


Daily Briefings

Do your hotel staff know the score? ~ Part 2

A daily briefing (with the whole team if numbers are small enough to make this logistically possible is ideal, or by department) can update everyone on anything that affects that day’s operation. It’s also a great way to get feedback from them too on things that need addressing sooner rather than later.

Cover such information as:

  • VIP guests
  • Special needs (e.g. disabled guests, special diets)
  • Regular guests and any known preferences, so staff can anticipate their requirements
  • Today’s menu and tasting, with details of all the ingredients of each dish, what to promote today, and what’s in short supply (even if only one dish has changed from yesterday’s menu, make sure it is communicated)
  • What special offers, events or deals you have coming up that need to be mentioned
  • What other activity there is in the hotel or surrounding area that could affect service in any way, e.g. maintenance, road works, concerts, weather.
  • Staff shortages, and cover of responsibilities

 

These actions ensure your staff are fully briefed and competent to deal with any guest’s queries or concerns.

A daily briefing also provides an opportunity for you to get feedback on any guest comments. You can discuss any questions or suggestions your team may have about operational issues that could have a bearing on the level of service or sales potential of the hotel. So, even on your busiest mornings make sure these briefings still happen – it’s generally on the days that are your busiest that things go wrong, and it’s generally your busiest days when you have the best opportunities for increasing sales.

Tomorrow we’ll look at regular update meetings.

My new online leadership coaching programme is being launched in September


Using the Coaching GROW model

I’ve been running a coaching skills workshop this week and it has reminded me of the simplicity and power of this simple coaching model. A word of wanring, this is not for the control freaks!

The model is GROW, probably one of most widely known coaching models.

GROW stands for GOAL, REALITY, OPTIONS and WILL

It is not appropriate for every situation, but can be used to great effect to tap into people’s potential. It is based on the principle that the coach asks questions and draws the answer from the coachee or employee. This leads to increased awareness, better buy in and commitment, increases confidence and  good development.

Goal

Setting the overall coaching objectives and the goals for the coaching session. Goals need to be SMART* There may two types of goal – one long term goal, then a short term goal for the session. Goals need to focus on what will be observed or happening once t is achieved.

Reality

Checking and raising awareness of the situation right now. This brings out the coachee’s perception of the situarion which can sometimes be very different from the manager’s. It is important that the manager does not make assumptions about what is happening, even if they think they already know! It is important to get a full a picture as possible about what is happening to get to the root of the problem.

Options

Finding alternative strategies, solutions, answers. This is usually the hardest part for the manager acting as coach, as it is all too easy to give the answers or make suggestions. This means the employee will continue to be dependent on the manager to come up with solutions and not have to think for themselves. It is far more rewarding for the employee to come up with their own solutions.

Will

Testing commitment to the goal, making concrete, realistic plans to reach it. We’ve all been to meetings when there has been a lot of talk and ideas and then you meet again a few weeks later and nothing has happened. The same will happen following a coaching session if there is no summing up of the course of action, and commitment from the coachee to take action.

This format works well for for day to day discussions in supporting your team in their work, as well as more formal one to one discussions on performance, objective setting, and development planning. It also gives a structure to use in team meetings for group problem solving.

So next time one of your team comes to you with a problem, before you just tell them what to do, stop and condsider if they could come up with the solution themselves by exploring each of these 4 questions.

This and other topics will be covered in my new online leadership coaching programme is being launched in September.

* See full article on setting SMART goals